The Promise of Sydney: Innovative approaches to Supporting human life

It has become clear that the same approaches will no longer enable us to achieve our bold ambitions for protected areas.  In order to ensure a healthy future for protected areas and the millions who depend on them, we must embark on a new direction.  That means that we must change.  But we cannot simply agree that change must happen; we must find promising new ways to change the status quo and demonstrate to the world with a new range of partners and stakeholders how we can together carry out these changes

Each of the twelve Streams and Cross-cutting themes of the World Parks Congress has drafted Innovative approaches to change in consultation with numerous experts and stakeholders in preparation for the World Parks Congress.  Based on real, innovative solutions, these documents posit a set of promising fresh approaches – focused around each topic area – to the challenges facing parks, people and the planet today.  They will each be deliberated and populated during the Congress with the boldest solutions for change at scale, and, by the final days of the Congress, revised by the stream and theme leaders for stakeholder endorsement.  They will serve as a central source of information and inspiration for the Vision for the Promise of Sydney.  Our hope is that these Innovative approaches will be activated by promises, pledges, and commitments by individuals, communities, non-governmental organizations, private companies and governments.  

The Innovative approaches articulate hypothetical bold steps we can take to achieve the greatest transformations in decision-making, in practice, in policy, in capacity and in financing for protected areas.  They source the most innovative solutions within protected areas to the world’s challenges to:

  • Demonstrate the value of protected areas to humanity
  • Advance innovative approaches based on evidence from inspiring solutions
  • Significantly augment broad sectoral collaboration around protected areas
  • Transform a full range of global, regional and local policies, such as the Sustainable Development Goals, to reflect the essential contributions of protected areas  

The Innovative approaches comprise two parts:

Part 1:

  • Vision: an ambition for a promising future
  • Analysis of the current situation
  • Recommendations for the most important ten-year transformation to achieve this ambition

Part 2:

  • Targets reflecting the pathway towards this transformation
  • The stakeholders, new and existing, needed to achieve this ambition 
  • Crucial considerations

 

What are your innovative approaches to change?  Join the conversation!

Comments

I present some inputs and suggestions for the innovative approaches to reaching conservation goals, they are included in the proposal text.

A strategy of innovative approaches and recommendations to support human life in the next decade

A promising future

Protected areas must be recognised as a key tool for sustainable development, through their role as critical suppliers of ecosystem services, including the conservation of genetic resources; sustainable production of food and materials; reliable supply of pure water; pollination for food security; and disaster risk reduction. As a result, they should be routinely integrated into both land and water use plans and national development plans.

Annex to a strategy of innovative approaches and recommendations to support human life in the next decade

2025: The next decade (to the next IUCN World Parks Congress) and beyond

15-30% of aid is shifted to investment in protected areas that are demonstrated to buffer from storm surges and sea level rise

Fish and wildlife provide essential sources of protein for communities across the globe as well as potential sources of revenue. They are crucial in supporting human life and importantly also livelihoods. Sustainable hunting and fishing, including falconry, where they are not already part of protected area management, need to be explored as activities which can greatly benefit protected area management as well as communities in and around them. Both activities have the ability to support livelihoods and cultures, increase food security, generate income, maintain wildlife numbers within the ecological and social carrying capacity of the environment, and build crucial local support for the conservation of biodiversity and habitats. This was evident from a great number of presentations during the work parks congress, particularly those addressing CBNRM - Community Based Natural Resource Management - and where sustainable use of fish and wildlife was a core component of the management plans.

Fish and wildlife provide essential sources of protein for communities across the globe as well as potential sources of revenue. They are crucial in supporting human life and importantly also livelihoods. Sustainable hunting and fishing, including falconry, where they are not already part of protected area management, need to be explored as activities which can greatly benefit protected area management as well as communities in and around them. Both activities have the ability to support livelihoods and cultures, increase food security, generate income, maintain wildlife numbers within the ecological and social carrying capacity of the environment, and build crucial local support for the conservation of biodiversity and habitats. This was evident from a great number of presentations during the work parks congress, particularly those addressing CBNRM - Community Based Natural Resource Management - and where sustainable use of fish and wildlife was a core component of the management plans.

Fish and wildlife provide essential sources of protein for communities across the globe as well as potential sources of revenue. They are crucial in supporting human life and importantly also livelihoods. Sustainable hunting and fishing, including falconry, where they are not already part of protected area management, need to be explored as activities which can greatly benefit protected area management as well as communities in and around them. Both activities have the ability to support livelihoods and cultures, increase food security, generate income, maintain wildlife numbers within the ecological and social carrying capacity of the environment, and build crucial local support for the conservation of biodiversity and habitats. This was evident from a great number of presentations during the work parks congress, particularly those addressing CBNRM - Community Based Natural Resource Management - and where sustainable use of fish and wildlife was a core component of the management plans.